The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

GoodReads Summary:
Jason has a problem.
He doesn’t remember anything before waking up in a bus full of kids on a field trip. Apparently he has a girlfriend named Piper, and a best friend named Leo. They’re all students at a boarding school for “bad kids.” What did Jason do to end up here? And where is here, exactly?
Piper has a secret.
Her father has been missing for three days, ever since she had that terrifying nightmare about his being in trouble. Piper doesn’t understand her dream, or why her boyfriend suddenly doesn’t recognize her. When a freak storm hits during the school trip, unleashing strange creatures and whisking her, Jason, and Leo away to someplace called Camp Half-Blood, she has a feeling she’s going to find out.
Leo has a way with tools.
When he sees his cabin at Camp Half-Blood, filled with power tools and machine parts, he feels right at home. But there’s weird stuff, too—like the curse everyone keeps talking about, and some camper who’s gone missing. Weirdest of all, his bunkmates insist that each of them—including Leo—is related to a god. Does this have anything to do with Jason’s amnesia, or the fact that Leo keeps seeing ghosts?
The Lost Hero (The Heroes of Olympus, #1)Review:
I was honestly so excited to get back into the world of Percy Jackson and the Olympians. This new series is one I’ve been excited for since reading the first, but even more so after finishing The Lost Hero. As I type this review (on my phone) I’m listening to the first chapter of the second book. There’s just something so fun about these stories and their characters.
Let’s jump into the characters. I absolutely adore Piper and Leo. They’re great best friends to Jason. We follow Jason at first, who has no memories and has somehow ended up on a school bus. Jason, despite not knowing literally anything, manages the challenges they face really well. I liked his natural leadership and his growing friendship with Leo and Piper.
Piper was probably my favorite. She’s torn between saving her dad, which means betraying her friends or being a hero. I thought this was such a complex inner battle. I loved how her story turned out. I also really loved seeing her grow and gain confidence, which as a daughter of Aphrodite is important with her ability to charm speak as it’s based on confidence.
Leo was adorable. He is the son of Hephaestus. He also has a rare fire ability. So, he’s learning how to control his ability and also trying to make himself believe that he is just as important to the team as the others. I thought he was great, the comedic relief but also a character with substance.
I really like the godly interactions. We get to see Hera quite a bit and though she isn’t well-liked, I could understand her feelings. I really loved Piper and Leo both getting to talk to their godly parents. I thought those interactions came at just the right times.
Overall, I loved this. As I mentioned I’m currently already listening to book two and it’s giving me all of the answers I still wanted from book one. There are so many questions were still left with, but were also given many answers. Riordan writes the story in the perfect way where were given enough information to be kept interested, but not too much we feel like everything is over. I also had a few things figured out but not all the details. Any mythology lovers are going to adore this series for sure.
Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

Summary: Jason has a problem.
He doesn’t remember anything before waking up in a bus full of kids on a field trip. Apparently he has a girlfriend named Piper, and a best friend named Leo. They’re all students at a boarding school for “bad kids.” What did Jason do to end up here? And where is here, exactly?91vcdxkm3dl

Piper has a secret.
Her father has been missing for three days, ever since she had that terrifying nightmare about his being in trouble. Piper doesn’t understand her dream, or why her boyfriend suddenly doesn’t recognize her. When a freak storm hits during the school trip, unleashing strange creatures and whisking her, Jason, and Leo away to someplace called Camp Half-Blood, she has a feeling she’s going to find out.

Leo has a way with tools.
When he sees his cabin at Camp Half-Blood, filled with power tools and machine parts, he feels right at home. But there’s weird stuff, too—like the curse everyone keeps talking about, and some camper who’s gone missing. Weirdest of all, his bunkmates insist that each of them—including Leo—is related to a god. Does this have anything to do with Jason’s amnesia, or the fact that Leo keeps seeing ghosts?

Review: I read Percy Jackson and the Olympians (written “PJO” for the rest of the post) a few years ago and immediately loved them so much I had to get the Heroes of Olympus series. I read the first three books but around the time I was starting the fourth, I moved across the country and it somehow got lost in the chaos. I’ve finally replaced it but since it’s been so long I’ll be rereading and reviewing the entire series.
I loved this book just as much the second time as I did the first for many different reasons. First, mythology is a topic that’s always interested me and I’ve always loved seeing how different authors turn those myths into fiction. I instantly loved Riordan’s take on Greek mythology and am really excited that this series includes some Roman mythology as well. If you don’t know, Roman mythology came directly from Greek so a lot of it is very similar but they’re still considered two entirely separate pantheons. In this book I got to see all of those similarities and differences and am excited for more of it in the next books.
Another of my favorite aspects of this book is the characters. First, I was really happy I got to see some of the old characters from the PJO series though I am very sad Percy wasn’t in it. Second, I just really love the characters Riordan creates. They’re flawed and relatable but also amazing and badass. I feel like they’re a better portrayal of their ages than many other YA books. The characters are around 15-16 in this book and while they have moments of maturity (being heroes and fighting monsters makes you grow up fast) you never forget that they’re still children. It’s one of the first things I loved about PJO as well. The children acted like children. They worry about silly things, they make gross jokes, their priorities are sometimes skewed, they’re impulsive. Since they’re a few years older in this book there’s certainly a bit more maturity but they’re still just kids.
The plot was really fun. There’s a lot of action and suspense, even a little romance, but mostly it was just fun to read. Our main characters are demigods going on a quest so there’s all sorts of magic and monsters. Crazy things happen to them constantly so if you’re looking for something realistic you should probably look somewhere else.
One of my favorite things about the way Riordan writes is the little clues he gives us. Either through prophecies and visions, or sometimes just things a character sees; and you’ll think, “oh, yeah! That means this” and other times you have no idea what it means. Usually it turns out to be a little different than you originally thought but there’s always this moment where something just clicks and you realize that scene earlier in the books had a hidden meaning.
Overall, I absolutely loved this book and can’t wait to start the next. I’d recommend this to anyone who like YA, fantasy, or mythology. I suggest reading PJO first but you likely wouldn’t be too confused if you skipped it. I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments. Thanks for reading!
-Antonia