Youngbloods by Scott Westerfeld

Summary:
Frey has spent her life in a family of deceivers, a stand-in for her sister, manipulated at her father’s command. Free from them at last, she is finding her own voice — and using it to question everything her family stood for.
Tally was once the most famous rebel in the world. But for over a decade, she’s kept to the shadows, allowing her myth to grow even as she receded. Now she sees that the revolution she led has not created a stable world. Freedom, she observes, has a way of destroying things.
As the world is propelled further into conflict and conspiracy, Frey and Tally join forces to put a check on the people in power, while still trying to understand their own power and where it belongs.
With Youngbloods, master storyteller Scott Westerfeld decisively brings back his most iconic character and merges his Impostors and Uglies series into a breathtaking tale of rivalry, rebellion, and repercussion.

Review:
Youngbloods is the final book in the spin off series of my childhood favorite, Uglies. This series stands up well on its own. If you haven’t and don’t want to read the Uglies series, then you will enjoy this fun dystopian series. But if you’re reading this because you’re a fan of the original series. Well, friends, do I have some bad news for you. Youngbloods essentially shits on the original series in a way that made me so mad I almost didn’t finish this book. I continued reading anyway, but Westerfeld really does Tally Youngblood dirty in this book. She’s so unlike the Tally we know and love from the first series. I’m very, very upset by how Tally was shown in this book and I don’t know if Westerfeld can make up for it.
Outside of my huge issue with Tally, I liked this book. I think the overarching plot issues were wrapped up in ways that I was happy with. I liked the action and adventure. I liked getting to see the places we know and love from the first series.
Overall, I liked this book least of all for this series. I don’t like what the author did to the original Uglies characters, but I liked how this story was wrapped up. I’ll go and reread my favorites now.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Pretties by Scott Westerfeld

GoodReads Summary:
Tally has finally become pretty. Now her looks are beyond perfect, her clothes are awesome, her boyfriend is totally hot, and she’s completely popular. It’s everything she’s ever wanted.
But beneath all the fun — the nonstop parties, the high-tech luxury, the total freedom — is a nagging sense that something’s wrong. Something important. Then a message from Tally’s ugly past arrives. Reading it, Tally remembers what’s wrong with pretty life, and the fun stops cold.
Now she has to choose between fighting to forget what she knows and fighting for her life — because the authorities don’t intend to let anyone with this information survive.
Pretties (Uglies, #2)Review:
Sadly, I liked Pretties less than the first book. My feelings were much the same as the first. The story was action-packed with high stakes and interesting characters. But those characters that I loved so much from the first book just weren’t the same.
Tally, the main character, made similar mistakes. She kept secrets which led to damaging her relationship with Shay. Her friendship with Shay was one of my favorite things about the first book and Shay became a sort of villain in this book. I guess it’s more of collateral damage than a villain, but I really didn’t like her. Tally was the same, fearless and fighting for what she believed to be right.
The parts with Shay toward the end were hard for me. Shay and a group of friends start cutting themselves and I really didn’t like that. I think there were definitely other ways the plot could have gone.
Then there’s Zane. I wasn’t really sold on Tally and David’s romance so I was happy to see Zane. I thought his history was interesting and brought complex plot lines to the story. I totally loved his romance with Tally. They made each other better and were mostly honest with one another. There were no big secrets aside from things they’d done in the past.
Overall, I definitely preferred the first book but I still had fun reading this. We see more of this bizarre futuristic world. I’m wondering what, if any, part that will play in future books. The storyline gets more complex with higher stakes. I was engaged the whole time I was reading and definitely left with a fierce desire to immediately pick up the next book.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.