A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

Summary: Looming war threatens all Feyre holds dear in the third volume of the #1 New York Times bestselling A Court of Thorns and Roses series.

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s manoeuvrings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit – and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well.

As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords – and hunt for allies in unexpected places. 

In this thrilling third book in the #1 New York Times bestselling series from Sarah J. Maas, the earth will be painted red as mighty armies grapple for power over the one thing that could destroy them all.

Review: Once again, I hardly know where to start. I have so many thoughts and feelings about this story and characters that I’m overwhelmed by it. In a good way. As soon as I finished I knew I had to get A Court of Frost and Starlight, and I never read novellas. My love for these characters is so great that I’ll take any chance to read more about them.
Let’s start with Feyre. I’ve liked her from the start but that’s somehow continued to increase throughout the books. First from her selfless bravery, then from the way she grew throughout the second book, and now because she’s an absolute badass. I spent the first few chapters just cheering her on while she spied on/ sabotaged Tamlin and the spring court. Later, when she was finally able to be High Lady of the Night Court, I only admired her more. She’s become confident in herself, her love, and her court and I loved watching her interactions with pretty much everyone. (Note: Unless you’ve read at least some of these books, you probably won’t understand what it really means that Feyre has become a High Lady; take it from me, it’s a really big deal.)
I still don’t like Tamlin. Some people think his actions by the end of the book are enough to redeem him at least a little but not for me. I think he’s a complete jerk who builds a “poor me” bubble around himself and how could anyone possibly believe the worst of him? How? Because you literally did everything possible to make everyone think you were the enemy. I don’t know how he could be surprised that people treated him as such.
Rhys is still my favorite book boyfriend. I adore his and Feyre’s relationship. They’re a team; they treat each other as equals and even when one of them goes off on their own or makes a mistake, they respect each others decisions whether they agree with them or not. Their love is what I think everyone should aspire to have.
Mor is amazing. She’s tough and fun and has the most tragic backstory. The one thing I didn’t like is the secret she’s kept from the group for hundreds of years. (Don’t worry, it’s not something that really affects the main storyline.) It just seems like, because the group is so close, that she should trust them not to judge her or to let it change the group’s dynamic. The fact that she doesn’t bothers me a little.
Cassian and Azriel are also fantastic. They have fairly opposite personalities; Cassian’s more in-your-face about pretty much everything while Azriel hides in his shadows and doesn’t really let anyone in. Getting glimpses of the softer side of Azriel is the best though. I just want to wrap him up in a bubble and protect him forever.
Amren is probably my favorite of the Inner Circle. She’s an all powerful being from another world trapped in a High Fae body. Her powers are limited in her current form but you frequently get glimpses of what she is by the way others behave around her. The fact that this tiny little person terrifies everyone she meets just makes me so happy.

**MINOR SPOILER ALERT**

What I don’t get is how anyone can believe Amren would betray them at the end. After seeing the way this family interacts throughout books two and three, I had no doubt that she had a plan and wasn’t actually betraying Feyre. Anyone who thought she would actually do that isn’t giving her enough credit.

**SPOILER ENDED**

I still can’t believe Hybern turned Elain and Nesta into High Fae. Elain just made me sad throughout the entire book. She’s like a tiny puppy being kicked. I really liked Nesta however. She’s still prickly and a little annoying and just mean to everyone but that’s just the shield she wears constantly. I think she grew a lot during this book and is one of the main reasons I want to read ACOFAS, to see how she’s doing after the war.
Lucien I really loved for the first half of this book. Then he disappears on his mission and you don’t see him until the end. I found this part irritating. It felt almost like Maas sent him on a wild goose chase so she wouldn’t have to figure out where he fit in with the rest of the Inner Circle. I would have liked to have seen more of him.
Overall I loved this book to the point where this series is definitely a new favorite of mine. It has the best characters and a really intricate plot. The final battle was intense, bloody and literally had me screaming at my husband to stop interrupting me. I’d recommend this series to everyone. The first book is a little more YA romance but the other two are far more complex and action-based. Tell me what you think in the comments because I could talk about this book for days. Thanks for reading!
-Antonia

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

Summary: Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.

Review: As much as I loved the first book, I loved this one more. I read it in about a day even though it’s over 600 pages long and I was a little overwhelmed when I was done. Not necessarily in a bad way, it’s just that so much happened and I had so many feelings that I was a bit lost when it was over.
In my review of A Court of Thorns and Roses, I talked about how I liked the fact that Feyre isn’t your typical hero; she does what she has to to protect those she loves even if it’s not “the right thing”. Some of these actions from the first book have resulted in her having PTSD. Partly because of the awful things that were done to her or that she saw in Amarantha’s court Under The Mountain, but a huge part of it is the things she herself did Under The Mountain. Even if we completely ignore the fact she’s been turned into High Fae (she’s literally not even human anymore and that’s an insane adjustment for anyone), everything that’s happened since the beginning of ACOTAR has been traumatizing. She’s trying, and failing, to cope as she comes to terms with who she’s become. This book had some of the best character development for her, particularly because it doesn’t happen overnight. Throughout this entire book she’s changing, growing, learning who she is and who she wants to be. A huge part of that growth is influence by Tamlin and Rhysand in vastly different ways but I’ll go into more detail about that later.
I slowly hated Tamlin more and more throughout this book. This seems to be the source of some contention for fans. Readers seem to either think his personality in ACOMAF is completely different from ACOTAR and that Maas forced it that way to make room for Rhys to be with Feyre; OR readers think it’s simply an extension of Tamlin’s personality that we didn’t see in ACOTAR but that was sort of amplified by the trauma of Under The Mountain. Honestly, I’m not sure what I think but it seems to fall somewhere in the middle for me. His change in ACOMAF definitely felt just a little forced but I’m also not surprised by it. As much as I loved him in ACOTAR, I definitely got that sense that he was a little controlling, a little possessive. Part of the problem might be that in the first book, that’s what Feyre wanted. She wanted to feel protected for once in her life, not have to do the protecting but after Under The Mountain she needed some semblance of control of her own life and Tamlin wouldn’t let her have that. I understand he watched her die and doesn’t know how to deal with that but even months later after Feyre’s tried telling him what she needs, after he’s promised to be better about it, he only gets more and more controlling. All that said, I still felt a little sorry for him right up until that last scene. I won’t spoil it for anyone but his actions at the end were the final straw for me. In my mind, there’s no excuse for what he did and I won’t forgive him for it.
Rhysand. Is. Perfect. Not that he doesn’t have flaws; of course he does. His flaws just made me love him more. Everything about Rhys’s story gave me all the emotions. It’s tragic and beautiful and funny. For me though, the main reason he’s my new favorite book boyfriend is for the way he interacts with Feyre. He works so hard to give her what she needs to deal with her trauma and he listens to her and respects what she says whether he agrees with her or not. He never tries to control her and actively gives her the freedom to act for herself to the point where, if there’s danger, he lets her handle it; he might step in when necessary but he never tries to fight her battles for her. This more than anything helps Feyre grow because she finally has the freedom to do what she needs to do for her own well-being. Rhys never treats Feyre as anything less than his equal and I absolutely adore that.
Rhys’s Inner Circle was one of my favorite parts of this book. Mor, Cassian, Azriel, and Amren are such unique, complex, lovable characters. I love that they, including Rhys and later Feyre, are a family first and the Night Court second. I’m beyond excited to see more of them in the next book.
Overall, this is one of my new favorite books. It had everything I want from a story; romance, friendship, complex character development, action, heart-wrenching moments, laugh-out-loud scenes, and an ending that just about killed me. I recommend this to everyone. Seriously. Just read this book.
I’d love to hear what you think. Thanks for reading!
-Antonia

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

Summary: Feyre’s survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price …

Dragged to a magical kingdom for the murder of a faerie, Feyre discovers that her captor, his face obscured by a jewelled mask, is hiding far more than his piercing green eyes would suggest. Feyre’s presence at the court is closely guarded, and as she begins to learn why, her feelings for him turn from hostility to passion and the faerie lands become an even more dangerous place. Feyre must fight to break an ancient curse, or she will lose him forever.

Review: I’m. Obsessed.
Maybe not as much as Amanda is (she literally called me when I told her I finished it and asked a billion questions about what I thought), but I still loved it. I’m having trouble focusing on writing this review because I just want to start the next book.
I was a little wary going into it. Amanda’s been trying to get me to read them for the longest time and my husband just read them recently. They’re both pretty good about not giving away huge spoilers but between them and the internet in general, I knew a lot about this series beforehand. Now I don’t want to spoil it for anyone else so I’ll be kind of vague, but certain things I knew about the characters ahead of time made me worried that I wouldn’t be able to connect with them the same way I normally would. Luckily it didn’t turn out to be a huge problem. I was still able to love the characters while impatiently waiting for the story to progress to certain parts I’d been excited for.
Feyre is my favorite. She has her ‘ignorant human’ moments (is anyone else getting as sick of this trope as I am?), but overall she’s a brave, intelligent, strong character who fights to protect those she cares about no matter what. I actually really enjoyed that side of her. So often, authors try to make characters who always do the right thing; the heroes have this unwavering moral compass and that’s what makes them heroes. Feyre isn’t like that. She protects herself and those she cares about and that’s it. She’s willing to do things, for her family, for Tamlin, that weigh on her conscience and would probably make her less of a hero t some. For me, I loved her more because she was so flawed.
I liked Tamlin a lot more than I was expecting to. He’s brooding, tough, sexy but able to have gentler moments with Feyre where he lets his guard down. I definitely think there were parts he could have handled differently. He has the arrogance of an immortal which might not have been bad by itself but combined with him treating Feyre as a fragile human who needs to be protected, resulted in some really awful things that might have been avoided if he’d done things differently.
Rhysand drives me nuts. I mostly only saw him toward the end of the book and I just need MORE. I know (from Amanda and my husband) that I’m going to love him later in the books but right now he’s still acting like a jerk. I can’t wait to get to know him better in the next book.
Lucien was a really fun character who added a lot of humor to otherwise serious scenes. Feyre’s sisters, Elain and Nesta, annoyed me at the beginning but I have hopes for my feelings changing later in the series, especially for Nesta.
Being a painter, Feyre’s descriptions of the setting were vivid and detailed without being tedious which I really liked. It gave her a reason to notice her surroundings in a show-don’t-tell sort of way. It was something I appreciated because it’s why I usually have trouble with settings.
The plot was fantastic. A little slower in the middle as Feyre and Tamlin got to know each other but the last half was insane. Fast-paced and filled with drama and action that kept me on the edge of my seat. Except for the couple chapters I started yesterday, I read this book straight through in one sitting.
I’d recommend it to anyone who likes YA, fantasy, romance, and especially stories about faeries. I thought the magic surrounding them and their culture was extremely unique in this book. I’d love to hear what you think in the comments. Thanks for reading.
-Antonia

*Please be aware that the book cover on this post is a link to purchase this book through Amazon. Feel free to purchase with our affiliate link (just click on the book cover) to support us!

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

Summary:
Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s maneuverings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit-and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well. As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords-and hunt for allies in unexpected places.
In this thrilling third book of the Court of Thorns and Roses series by #1 New York Times bestselling author Sarah J. Maas, the earth will be painted red as mighty armies grapple for power over the one thing that could destroy them all.

Review:
This third book in one of my favorite series with some of my favorite characters starts off with a scene from Rhysand’s past. A scene from the war five hundred years ago that has him looking for Cassian’s body, looking for him whether he’s dead or alive. I feel like this scene was a good way of showing what the impending war is going to make you feel and also a way to further show how much Rhys cares about his loved ones.
I really liked this book because we got to see deeper into the characters. Like Lucian, we get to see Lucian and Feyre’s relationship change, partially because he’s not sure if she’s acting and partially because his mate is her sister who is somewhere in the Night Court and he can’t do anything about it. A decent amount of this book is spent with Feyre playing Tamlin in the Spring Court. She’s pretending that her bond has been broken by the crazy king and that she was tricked when in reality she’s the Night Court’s mole and is getting all the information and causing as much trouble as she can. I absolutely loved Feyre playing spy. She was conniving and devious and everything you would imagine a High Lady of the Night Court to be. It was so satisfying to see her play Tamlin the way she did because he deserved that and more for the drama he put her through and the awful things he did to try to get her back.
As for Lucien, I’m glad he left the Spring Court with Feyre. He’s so worried about obeying orders and pleasing Tamlin it’s almost annoying. So it’s nice to be able to get to know him more outside of the Spring Court and Tam’s influence. I genuinely laughed so much at Lucien interacting with the squad and him seeing how well Feyre fits in with them. It was super funny to see him so out of his element.
In their journey back to the Night court we get to see bits of the Autumn Court. I really enjoyed getting to see more of this fictional world because it’s all just so beautiful, and in Autumn Court’s case it’s viciously beautiful much like those who rule it. Seeing more of Prythian was probably my favorite part of this book. We get to visit the Summer Court again, while not for the best reasons but it’s probably my favorite with the gorgeous water and summer theme (summer is my favorite season in everyday life). We also get to visit the Dawn Court when all the courts come together for a meeting. The Dawn Court sounds incredible. Sarah J. Maas did an amazing job with the settings in this series. This is a world that I would without a doubt love to visit, outside of the crazy time of conflict of course.
Sticking with the subject of characters, once Feyre made it back to the Night Court with Lucien we got to see her training with Cassian and learning to fly with Azriel and Armen training Nesta and all of them trying to help Elaine. I just love these people so much. They all function so well together knowing when they can push one another and knowing when to back off. They have so much fun together and so much love for each other. They’re a family I wouldn’t mind being a part of.
Let’s talk about the sisters. We get to see Feyre and her sisters interact in a totally different way in this book. Nesta and Elaine have become a part of her world again when they were ‘made’ by the cauldron. Elaine seems to be in the same place mentally that Feyre was when she survived under the mountain whereas Nesta seems to just want to argue about anything she can. Nesta is (and always has been) insanely protective of Elaine, but it’s increased tenfold now. It’s very clear that these sisters love one another, but aren’t sure how to express that, especially now that Elaine is little more than a shell of herself, but they make it work the best they can. I really enjoyed watching the sisters develop together in their the new dynamic of their relationship, but also watching them develop further as individuals. As the book progresses Elaine comes out of her shell with a little help from everyone and does her best to accept her new life. Nesta does the same, she sees how selfless and dedicated Feyre is and makes the right choice to train with Armen and do what she can to help turn the tide for the war in their favor.
So when it comes to the war actually happening it was super interesting to see all of the High Lords come together and share their expertise and decide what to do and when. It was an interesting dynamic between characters especially because nothing seemed to go in their favor. They faced obstacle after obstacle, coming up with plan A through Z for their next move. There were some surprising allies that appeared, allies that we thought were enemies. Feyre wasn’t the only one that was good at playing a part. At one point, all of the players had pretty much accepted that they were going to lose and everyone was going to die and that’s the moment that the tide turned. It was such an incredible moment when the allies they didn’t know were coming showed up and hope was renewed that the courts had a fighting chance.
The one thing I have to say that may be a slight spoiler is about the father of Nesta, Elaine and Feyre. Their dad comes in at the last moment with three ships filled with allies and reinforcements that all had lost hope of arriving. The ships were named ‘The Nesta, The Elaine and The Feyre.” He did this for his daughters because he wanted to show them he could be the father that they always wanted and deserved. This had even the cold Nesta in awe. This was just such a heartwarming moment that I had to mention it.
A Court of Wings and Ruin was ended fabulously. There was no bullshit ‘happily ever after’ moment. The story ended with the family together and struggling together and on their own to be okay with everything that had happened. It wasn’t the corny feel good ending, but it was an ending that left me happy because good had triumphed over evil. The war was over and now it was time to heal and rebuild. It was the right ending for this story.
As I’ve said in my reviews of the first two books in the series, go to the story, buy these books and read them as fast as you can. This is one of my favorite series because they’re amazing. There are just so many fabulous quotes and feel good moments that can be taken and applied to real life. These are the kind of books that tell a story, but also tell you to be a good person, but defend what you love. It’s a great story that gives some strong messages about life. So buy it, read it and love it forever like I do.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

*Please be aware that the book cover on this post is a link to purchase this book through Amazon. Feel free to purchase with our affiliate link (just click on the book cover) to support us!

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

Summary:
Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court-but at a steep cost. Though now she has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.
Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigated its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms-and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future-and the future of a world torn apart.
New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Sarah J. Maas expands Feyre’s world beyond even her wildest imagination in this seductive and stunning sequel to A Court of Thorns and Roses.
Review:
This is the second book in a series that I love very much. So if you’re open to reading whatever, don’t even read this review, just go buy the whole series and binge read them all. I promise you won’t regret it.
Okay, now for the actual book. A Court of Mist and Fury starts three months after the end of the first book. At this point, Feyre is trying to figure out who she is now that she’s a High Fae. She’s not the same person that she was when her story started. She’s done some things that she can’t unsee and a part of her wishes that she died under the mountain. You would think that because she and Tamlin survived and she saved everyone that all would be flowers and butterflies, but that’s not the case.
In an attempt to get everything back to normal in the Spring Court, the wedding is the big event to show that everything and everyone is okay and life is back to normal. Surprise! Tamlin proposed to Feyre and they’re going to get married. This is how it was it was told to the readers. For some reason, (I’d say for the sake of keeping the book a reasonable length because it’s six hundred pages.) we don’t get to see the proposal, just a brief story about it happening. This shows me that it’s not a hugely significant event, which it is, but not in the way you would think it is.
It’s extremely obvious that all of the people in this story are just trying to get through the days and pretend they’re okay. They’re all doing the best they can to try to get back to their lives before Amarantha. It’s clear from the first page that Feyre is having the most trouble with this. She’s not at all the same person she was. She wakes up every night vomiting from her nightmares. She just can’t seem to get it together. She doesn’t even want to paint anything. It’s honestly sad because she’s not the same Feyre without thinking about painting everything. She’s not in a good place at all.
I think the wedding was too soon, a rushed attempt to get life back to normal. She’s not excited to plan it or even to attend it. She leaves all the planning to Ianthe, who sucks and you’ll learn why. Even her dress, which Feyre hates, but doesn’t do anything about it. The Feyre from the first book would have said, “hell no, I’m not wearing this.” But she just lets it all happen. The day of the wedding Alis literally pushes her outside to the aisle. Alis says, “You sound like you’re going to your funeral.” And “it’ll be over faster than you can blink, she promised and gently pushed me into the last of the sunlight.” SHE LITERALLY SOUNDED LIKE SHE WAS GOING TO HER FUNERAL SO WHY DID EVERYONE LET HER GO THROUGH WITH THIS.
Now I get to talk about my favorite character in this whole series, Rhysand. It was just too perfect for him to swoop in and save Feyre on her wedding day. His grand entrance when coming to claim Feyre for their agreed upon week at the wedding totally suits the personality that he presents. He’s my favorite villain, probably because we learn that he’s not actually a villain, but he’s my favorite even before that.
The first week that Feyre spending with Rhys at the Night Court, he learns that she cannot read. So she spends the week writing ridiculous sentences that he gives her. It’s hilarious and silly and the break that she needed from pretending that she’s alright.
So this book actually made me mad, but its 100% Tamlin’s fault and Lucien (who is supposed to be Feyre’s friend, but is too worried about following orders and putting out a good image for everyone else.) Feyre told them over and over again what she needed. I think she actually said “I feel like I’m drowning” at one point and they still wouldn’t listen. Wouldn’t let her go help other towns, they wouldn’t let her leave the property to ease Tamlin’s fears. They didn’t listen to what she was screaming that she needed because what Tamlin needed was more important and that pissed me off so badly. I just don’t understand how he couldn’t or didn’t see what he was doing to her. How could he continue to choose what he wanted over what she was telling him she needed and not see how that was affecting her? I just don’t see how he can justify anything that he did to her and I 100% support Feyre leaving.
So Feyre goes through some huge character development in this book. After everything she went through and did under the mountain to save Tamlin, she’s come out a different person. She’s become a broken girl instead of the one who was willing to fight whoever and however she needed. But as she tells Tam over and over again what she needs and she sees him prioritize his needs over hers, she realizes that she’s becoming a different person; she’s not the same girl that fell in love with Tamlin. She’s a girl that has no faith in herself or her feelings or her choices and it’s just so so sad. This book is pretty heartbreaking for the sole reason of having to see and feel what Feyre is going through and that no one is helping her until Rhys comes to save the day, AGAIN.
Once Rhysand saves her from the Spring Court, again. We meet a whole new set of friends. They’re funny and caring and silly and so full of love for one another. Feyre learns some things about the Night Court and similar to in the first book, everything she thought she knew is wrong. She learns the truth about the Night Court and why Rhys acts the way he does. Rhys and his “court” are more than just that. They’re a family instead of subordinates taking orders. They listen and argue and care about one another. Once Feyre is in the Night Court Rhys tries to get her involved in the craziness of the world but he doesn’t order her around or push her. He offers her choices and lets her decide. He does exactly what she begged Tam to do for her and she didn’t even ask Rhys.
One of the things I loved most about this book was finally getting to see more of Prythian. Being introduced to Velaris, the Night Court’s secret Court of Dreams, it’s essentially described as a utopia. A place that Rhys has done anything and everything in his power to protect. I would have loved to see Velaris through Feyre from the first books eyes, what her thoughts and how she would have wanted to paint it. The other place we get to visit is the Summer Court, which is my favorite. If I was in this world, I would be a part of the Summer Court. The city sounds incredible and I just loved getting to see more of the world Feyre now found herself immersed in.
I don’t like to give spoilers, so I’m sorry if it seems vague or out of place, but once Feyre starts to realize that her relationship with Tamlin wasn’t as romantic and perfect as she thought it was hard. It was hard to feel that with her even though I had realized it long before her. It’s almost like she blames herself for coming out from under the mountain a different person when Tam’s the only reason she went there at all. Tamlin couldn’t love her how she needed to be loved and it broke her. So when she started to develop feelings for Rhysand she was understandably conflicted. Seeing it all from the outside (and also I’m rereading this series) it was super obvious that these two were so good for each other. It just takes her a while to come to that same realization.
The ending of this book was incredible. Don’t finish this book unless you have the next one though. Hello, cliffhanger. The way Sarah J. Maas ended this book was not at all expected. It was a total twist but in the best way possible. With all the craziness and drama that went down in the last pages, the ending leaves you wanting so much more, but also saying “what the hell just happened” at the same time.
So if it wasn’t clear already, I love this book and I love this series. I love all the characters, even the ones I don’t like. I recommend this book to those like me that are no longer “young adults” but still love to read the genre. I wouldn’t say younger kids should read this because there are some pretty sexy scenes. This whole book is beautiful. The writing is beautiful, the places we see are beautiful, the characters, the struggles, the drama, it’s all beautiful and heartbreaking and will change your life. So read them and love them forever like I do.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

*Please be aware that the book cover on this post is a link to purchase this book through Amazon. Feel free to purchase with our affiliate link (just click on the book cover) to support us!

A Court of Thorns and Roses – Sarah J. Maas

Summary:
When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a beast-like creature arrives to demand retribution. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she knows about only from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not an animal but Tamlin-one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled their world.
As Feyre dwells on his estate, her feelings for Tamlin transform from icy hostility into a fiery passion that burns through every lie and warning she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But an ancient, wicked shadow over the faerie lands is growing, and Feyre must find a way to stop it… or doom Tamlin-and his world-forever.
Review:
Okay, first off I want to say that while it has been entirely too long since we have posted a review, you should get ready. I’m finally in a place where I have time to read and actually review books again. So this is only the beginning of a review spree.
I’m rereading this series because the newest in the series just came out. This is one of my new favorite series and I hope I can make it yours too. These books are about so much more than what they are actually about and I just want the whole world to love these words as much as I do.
This story opens with an introduction to our main character, Feyre. She’s one of my favorite female main characters out of quite a lot of books I’ve read in the last few years. She’s stubborn but always tries to do the right thing. Even though she is the youngest member of her family, which consists of two sisters and their father all living in poverty, she is the caretaker. She spends her days in the woods hunting. She hunts for food as well as things to sell. Usually keeping half of watch she catches for her family to eat and sells or stores the other half while also selling the skins for whatever she can. She keeps her family from starvation, not that they deserve it. Her sisters don’t care to help and only do because Feyre controls the little money they have to spend and she won’t give them any to spend on nothing if they don’t at the very least help with the chores. Their father is the most useless of all. After losing the family fortune on a risky investment he was beaten by those he owed money to and messed his knee up pretty badly. He mostly spends his time sitting in the house carving little wooden sculptures and being useless.
Feyre and her family live in a rundown cottage just trying to survive in the world. In their world, there is a wall that divides the human population from the Fae population. Faeries are seen as bad, terrifying monsters that live to torture humans. Feyre is always hearing about this or that village that’s been attacked and pillaged by some faerie or another. So the overall view of the Fae is pretty negative. So when Feyre kills a wolf that is actually a faerie in the forest and the faerie’s High Lord comes calling for retribution, it seems like the end of her world. She gives herself up to the creature that comes for her to protect her family and even as she’s being taken away, she’s still trying to make sure her family will survive by telling them what they need to do without her.
This story is amazing because the author gives us just enough information to keep the reader interested and dying to know what’s going to happen next. It’s told in the first person from Feyre’s perspective, which I really enjoy because we get to see the world of faeries from someone who’s afraid and hates the Fae people because of all of the misinformation she’s been given her whole life. I think it’s really interesting to see the world through her eyes because we get to learn about how false all of her misconceptions are. This story is paced nicely, the story flows in a way that makes sense.
One of my favorite things about our main character is her love for painting and the way she sees the world. She sees the world, especially once she goes into faerie, as if she wants to turn it into a painting. Consistently observing colors she’s never seen before and wondering how to make those colors to put on a canvas. I think this was a really interesting method for the author to use to describe setting and such. Seeing the world through Feyre’s eyes we get to see that even though she’s in a place she’s terrified of, it’s a beautiful place and we can tell that because of her extreme desire to paint everything she sees. I guess it’s more that we’re seeing this world through the eyes of an artist. Along with this artists eye comes the fact that she’s incredibly observant. She’s always paying attention, even more so once she’s living within the Spring Court. She’s full of questions once she’s there, even if she’s not asking the right questions at first, I still appreciate this as part of who she is. It’s something that will serve her well.
Okay enough about Feyre, for now. Let’s talk about some other characters. The High Lord, Tamlin. At the start of this story, he seems uninterested. He’s definitely someone with anger issues, this is apparent from the very start. But he seems like maybe he’s not such a bad guy because he could have just killed Feyre and been done with it all. As the story goes on, we see him trying to put more of an effort into befriending our main character, an effort she stubbornly refuses because she’s focused on trying to escape and go back home. Once she realizes there is no escape, she’s more willing to get to know Tamlin. This is also helped by the fact that Tamlin gave her family an incredible amount of money so that they wouldn’t all starve to death without Feyre to care for them. This fact was probably what made her more open to knowing him. Tamlin is portrayed as an honorable, loyal, caring, just all around good guy.
I really enjoyed following Feyre while she discovers that most of the things she thinks she knows about the Fae are in fact false. They can lie, iron has no effect on them, etc, etc. I also really enjoyed getting to experience all of the new holidays and celebrations and whatnot that take place above the wall that she’s never even heard of.
The love affair between Tamlin and Feyre is just so romantic and adorable and cute it’s almost too much. They’re the perfect love story, once Feyre actually lets herself admit that she has feelings for Tam. She’s in denial for quite a while during the time that Tamin is wooing her.
The author does a very good job of showing what’s happening instead of just telling the story, which is something that I’m learning to do better in my own personal writing. So getting to see it in action is nice. Reading the story feels like I’m in it, I’m a part of the story because the author’s showing me whats happening, not is telling me.
Some final thoughts, A Court of Thorns and Roses was an interesting but twisted beauty and the beast sort of story where the weak little human girl saves the world with some help from unlikely friends. There is so much more I could say about this story and the characters in it, but I have three more books in the series to review, so I’m going to focus on the two that this story is focused on. So take my advice and go buy this book so you can love it as much as I do.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

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