Amanda's Adventures · Everything & Anything · The Readers Favorites

Gemina by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

GoodReads Summary:
Moving to a space station at the edge of the galaxy was always going to be the death of Hanna’s social life. Nobody said it might actually get her killed.
The sci-fi saga that began with the breakout bestseller Illumina continues on board the Jump Station Heimdall, where two new characters will confront the next wave of the BeiTech assault.
Hanna is the station captain’s pampered daughter; Nik the reluctant member of a notorious crime family. But while the pair is struggling with the realities of life aboard the galaxy’s most boring space station, little do they know that Kady Grant and the Hypatia are headed right toward Heimdall, carrying news of the Kerenza invasion.
When an elite BeiTech strike team invades the station, Hanna and Nik are thrown together to defend their home. But alien predators are picking off the station residents one by one, and a malfunction in the station’s wormhole means the space-time continuum might be ripped in two before dinner. Soon Hanna and Nik aren’t just fighting for their own survival; the fate of everyone on the Hypatia—and possibly the known universe—is in their hands.
But relax. They’ve totally got this. They hope.
Review:
I just finished reading Gemina and I’m 100000% still reeling. How are you going to end a book like this? I’m pretty furious with Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff because it’s super unfair of them to do this to me, their reader. Especially after screwing with my feelings LITERALLY the entire book.

“You wanna know how it ends?”

Get outta here with that shit. OF COURSE, I WANT TO KNOW HOW IT ENDS WHY ELSE WOULD I BE READING THIS BOOK. IM SO MAD RIGHT NOW. I CAN’T EVEN.
I’m legit a bundle of sadness and mad and happy. Somehow all at the same time. This story was (idk how) even crazier than Illuminae. It’s written in the same formatting as the first, which I totally loved. (Check out my review for Illuminae here.) Gemina is told via a series of journal entries, transcribed video surveillance feeds, instant message conversations, and emails. This is such a creative and interesting way to tell a story. I think it really helps the story fly by. This is not a small book, but I read it in two days. (It would have been one, but I have a baby now and I have to be responsible and stuff.)
I was a little sad that Gemina didn’t continue to follow Katy and Ezra because I totally adored them, but I definitely enjoyed our main characters. Hanna and Nik were extremely entertaining. They were sassy and fierce. But also so loyal and caring. They were excellently written characters.
Hanna is portrayed by others as a princess who thinks she’s better than everyone else. She’s got a perfect life and the perfect boyfriend and gets everything she wants. Nik literally calls her “Highness” (which is adorable and sassy.) But the reader gets to know her better than that. She’s super down to earth and knows that she has opportunities that not many others are afforded and she’s grateful for them, even if they’re not how “regular” families do things. She’s a station captain’s daughter, so why shouldn’t she take advantage of the opportunities that are provided. These opportunities are what save her life in this story. Without her military strategy sessions with her dad or the various martial arts that she’s learned she wouldn’t have survived the things she did. She proves herself to be a little pampered but also mostly kick ass. Because that’s absolutely what she did. She kicked ass and took names for every page of this book. Except for the moments she allowed herself to break down because of the horrible things happening around her. I liked this realistic aspect of the book. The world is falling apart, she’s not supposed to be able to just run around and kick ass and not feel anything. She’s climbing through the ventilation shafts with tears streaming down her face because she has no idea who’s still alive and who’s dead. I like this because too many books just skim over the bad stuff and don’t let the character feel what’s going on because it’s heat of the moment or whatever. Anyway, I loved all sides of Hanna Donnelly. She was an excellent heroine.

“You might only get one shot. So shoot. You know who said that? … Hanna ****ing Donnelly. That’s who.”

When it comes to Nik, I didn’t like him at first. That ‘bad boy’ image just didn’t do it for me. But like Hannah, we really got to know him. As we got to know him we learned that he isn’t so tough as he might like us to think. I really liked Nik. I liked learning about his past and seeing him interact with his cousin Ella. You can really tell that Nik would do anything for his family, and has proven that. He also proves that he is someone that tries to hide his feelings via inappropriate jokes (which is basically what his conversations with Hanna consisted of for a solid chunk of the book.) He’s got a great sense of humor.
I just have to mention all of the heartbreaking plot twist and how seriously messed up they were. The authors were really trying to screw with me by telling me this horrible thing happened and then saying, “Just kidding, this didn’t actually happen.” And somehow did this MORE THAN ONCE to us. This book was written so well and I might consider giving my first born child up to get the third book, Obisdio (this is a joke. I only say it because she’s crying while I try to write this really fast.) I honestly have no idea what’s going to happen in this last book, but I can tell you I’m SO EXCITED even though I know Kaufman and Kristoff are going to, once again, rip my heart out, stomp on it and then put it back in my chest, slightly mangled but still beating.

If this sounds like a good time to you, feel free to read these books. You won’t regret it. I promise.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

*Please be aware that the book cover on this post is a link to purchase this book through Amazon. Feel free to purchase with our link (just click on the book cover) to support us!

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